Adriana Herrera PayDestiny FounderLearn to write a salary negotiation email and how to successfully negotiate your salary via email with this How to Negotiate Salary via Email article.

If you want more tools to successfully negotiate a job offer click here.

Adriana Herrera PayDestiny FounderLearn to write a salary negotiation email and how to successfully negotiate your salary via email with this How to Negotiate Salary via Email article.

If you want more tools to successfully negotiate a job offer click here.

How to Negotiate Salary in Email (6 Free Salary Negotiation Emails + 31 Proven Do’s and Don’ts)

by | Last updated Nov 17, 2022

How to Negotiate Salary in Email (Icon)

Are you wondering how to negotiate salary in email?

If so, this article is for you! When it comes to salary negotiation, there are a lot of questions that come up. How do you write a salary negotiation email? What is the best way to negotiate salary over email? Are there pros and cons to negotiating salary over email?

In this article, we will answer all of these questions and more. You’ll get 31 do’s and don’ts, steps to learn how to negotiate salary in email, tips to write a salary negotiation email, free salary negotiation email samples, the ability to download a salary negotiation email sample pdf, an example of an email salary negotiation between an employer and potential hire, and answers to frequently asked questions.

Whether you are early in your career and negotiating a job offer or you are negotiating salary with your current employer, read on for everything you need to know about how to negotiate salary in email!

How to Negotiate Salary in Email (Icon)

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What is salary negotiation?

Salary negotiation is the process of bargaining with an employer for your desired compensation. While the phrase “salary negotiation” implies a negotiation of just your base pay this is not the case. A complete salary negotiation should include negotiation of your total rewards which includes:

  • Base pay
  • Benefits
  • Job perks
  • Stock options
  • Job title
  • Signing bonus
  • Other income impacting variables (e.g. performance and bonus schedule)
  • Other variables that increase your happiness at work and ability to be successful 

    Should you negotiate salary over email?

    There are pros and cons to negotiating salary over email. Here are some things to consider:

    Pros of a salary negotiation over email include:

    • It can be easier to structure your points over email
    • More time to research
    • More time to think about what you want
    • You are less likely to accept a low offer because you are uncomfortable and/or intimidated by the salary negotiation process
    • You are less likely to say the wrong thing
    • You can avoid an awkward face-to-face conversation
    • You can avoid the pressure and emotion that comes with an in-person salary negotiation
    • You can keep a record of the negotiation
    • You can send documentation with all your researched points (and cited sources) for easy reference by both parties

    Cons of a salary negotiation over email include:

    • A need to be very concise to avoid a potential for miscommunication
    • It can be difficult to gauge the other person’s response to your proposals and counteroffers over email
    • It can feel cold or impersonal, especially if you have not met the person before
    • It can be difficult to read and understand the person’s tone 
    • The chance that there is less room for compromise
    • The other person may not take you as seriously 
    • The other person can easily say “No” making it difficult to continue the negotiation
    • The other person could take an offer or proposal and run with it, without giving you a chance to counteroffer
    • The other person may perceive they can lowball because you’re hiding behind email
    • The negotiation could drag on
    • You can’t read body language over email
    • You might not get what you want

    How to Negotiate Salary in Email (31 Proven Do’s and Don’ts)

    There are a few key things to remember when negotiating your salary in email. Below are 31 proven “How to negotiate salary in email” do’s and don’ts. 

    When negotiating salary over email DO:

    1. Ask questions to ensure you understand the job’s full duties and responsibilities 
    2. Ask what the salary range for the position is
    3. Ask questions about how the company makes compensation decisions (e.g. Does the company compensate employees based on their location or is there another formula that the company uses to establish base salary?)
    4. Ask questions about benefits, job perks, other incentives, and a signing bonus (if negotiating a job offer)
    5. Be honest throughout the entire negotiation
    6. Be polite and professional and show gratitude in all of your communications, at every stage of the negotiation
    7. Be prepared to negotiate job perks, stocks, commission rates, etc. in case there is no budget to offer you a specific base pay or the company has other restrictions that can limit base pay
    8. Be prepared to be patient, to stay the course, and play the salary negotiation waiting game (if you rush the process you could end up negotiating against yourself) 
    9. Be specific 
    10. Get leverage via other (real) competing offers 
    11. Know what you are negotiating for by coming up with a competitive base pay number that reflects your market value and your baseline walkaway rate 
    12. Prepare a list of quantified accomplishments that communicate why you are worth the base pay you are asking for and relate your achievements to the duties and responsibilities of the position
    13. Research the base pay for someone with your skills, experience, education, and track record of success (in your area if relevant to the company’s compensation formula)
    14. Send clear and concise emails free of grammar and spelling errors 

    When negotiating salary over email DON’T:

    1. Beg or plead 
    2. Forget to communicate your excitement and passion for the position 
    3. Forget to say “Thank you” at all stages of your negotiation: beginning, during, and at the conclusion (no matter the result of the negotiation)
    4. Forget that you are negotiating the job’s duties in relation to your abilities and experience
    5. Get impatient and accept the first counteroffer 
    6. Give an ultimatum 
    7. Limit the negotiation to money 
    8. Make demands
    9. Make the negotiation personal
    10. Make threats such as not accepting the job offer or leaving your job 
    11. Outright say “No”
    12. Overlook the importance of clearly communicating why you are worth what you’re asking for using quantified examples 
    13. Propose a base pay number without knowing what the company’s salary range is
    14. Propose a base pay number without researching what the market is paying
    15. Send an email that is angry, hostile, or demanding
    16. State you need more money because you have certain financial needs and bills to pay
    17. Use vague language 

    How to Negotiate Salary in Email (Steps)

    Now that you know what to do and what not to do, let’s take a look at the art and science of writing a salary negotiation email.

    How do you write a negotiation email?

    When negotiating salary in person it’s easier to build rapport with the person you’re negotiating with. Having good rapport with the person with whom you are negotiating is important. Good rapport increases your likeability and consequently likeability increases the effectiveness of persuasive comments.

    When negotiating over email you lose the ability to build rapport through small talk and funny (appropriate and professional) comments.

    As a result when writing a salary negotiation email it’s important to thoughtfully build rapport through the tone and format of your writing. To do this a salary negotiation email should:

    • Have an optimized subject line (if you are not responding to an offer email)
    • Be personalized
    • Have formatting that does not feel overwhelming and is easy to skim (i.e. your email does not cause feelings of confusion or stress)
    • Express gratitude
    • Express excitement
    • Express passion

    Now that you know the art of building rapport in a salary negotiation email let’s dive into the science of negotiating salary in email and how to write a salary negotiation email.

    Say “Thank you”

    When you receive a job offer the first thing you want to do is express your excitement and appreciation for the opportunity by saying “Thank you.” Saying “Thank you” is professional, courteous, and helps you build rapport with the person you are negotiating with.

    Find out if the offer is equitable

    After you say “Thank you” you want to confirm if the offer is equitable. To do this ask for details about how the offer was put together and where it falls on the compa ratio for the position.

    To do this you can reply something like…

    “I’m very excited for the opportunity.

     

    I want to make sure I thoroughly understand the offer. Can you please share where it falls on the compa ratio for this position?”

    The answer to this question will let you know where the offer falls in comparison to the median pay for the position. This information paired with details on the company’s compensation formula for the role will let you know if the offer is equitable compared to other people in the position at the company with similar skills and experience level.

    Ask for time to review the offer

    Once you receive details that help you determine if the offer is equitable, ask for time to review the offer.

    Some employers may push for an answer and not give you time to review. This is an employer salary negotiation tactic to rush you into accepting the offer. Don’t fall for it. Rather be professional and let them know you’re excited about the offer but need time to review the details.

    If you’ve only been made a verbal offer make sure to request the details in writing. This ensures you have a “formal” offer from the employer and provides a point of reference that will support your market research.

    Do your research

    Research what companies at the same stage as the company making the offer, in the same industry, and in the city the company uses to benchmark salary are compensating someone with your skills and experience to perform the job’s duties.

    Make a list of quantified achievements

    Create personal performance data that demonstrates your ability to be successful in the role. To create your personal performance data, review the job description and make a list of quantified achievements that reflect your ability to successfully perform the job’s duties and responsibilities.

    Let’s walk through an example…

    Quantified Achievement Example

    In this example let’s say you are preparing to negotiate a User Experience Designer job.

    A User Experience Designer is responsible for designing Web applications and mobile apps that are easy to use and contribute to a company’s growth.

    Based on the objectives of a User Experience Designer’s duties and responsibilities you’d want to create quantified achievements that clearly demonstrate that you have successfully designed easy to use Web applications and mobile apps.

    A quantified achievement communicating this could be…

    I increased annual customer conversions from 0.8% to 2.4% resulting in a $623,750.00 quarterly lift in revenue by analyzing heatmaps and using the data to design new landing pages with one-click user sign ups.

    Set goals and your must-haves

    Use your market research and personal performance data to set total rewards negotiation goals (i.e. base pay, stock options, bonuses, etc.). Set your:

    • Must-haves, the minimum you’re willing to accept
    • Nice-to-haves, areas you can be flexible in a negotiation
    • Target, the most complete and competitive total rewards package

    When setting your goals it’s important to be mindful of the company’s salary range for the position but understand that unless the company utilizes standardized compensation formulas to determine salary it’s possible to negotiate past the top of a salary range (with the right justification/negotiation points).

    Confirm the offer is negotiable

    Before you send a salary negotiation email, set the stage for a positive salary negotiation by confirming that the offer you received is negotiable.

    When you confirm an offer is negotiable you: 1.) ensure you don’t offend the employer by trying to negotiate an offer that is “best and final,” and 2.) ensure you are on the same page with the employer and don’t confuse them or catch them off guard.

    Clearly communicate a specific ask

    When the employer confirms that the offer is negotiable, clearly communicate a specific initial ask/counteroffer by communicating your appreciation for the original offer, your excitement for the opportunity, your market research, your achievements, and what you want (i.e. a specific ask/counteroffer for your target goal).

    Stay the course and make counteroffers

    73% of employers expect a salary negotiation. On average just one counteroffer increases a base pay offer by 7.4%.

    Continue making counteroffers using your market data and quantified achievements until you maximize the total rewards package. Make sure you don’t forget about the art of writing a salary negotiation email and that you express gratitude and excitement for the opportunity in each counteroffer.

    Make sure to negotiate all job offer details: base pay, stock options, sign on bonus, job title (if relevant), job perks, benefits, stipends, commission, career advancement opportunities (such as opportunities to shadow an executive in certain settings), and details that will increase your work happiness (e.g. no meeting Fridays or a four-day work week).

    It may feel uncomfortable to feel like you’re “asking for a lot” but remember a salary negotiation is a collaboration in which you work with the employer to determine compensation you will receive in exchange for the work that you will perform and its value.

    Get all agreed to details in writing

    Once you reach an agreement make sure every detail no matter how small is included in your Employee Offer Letter. If a negotiated detail is not included in the terms and conditions of your Employee Offer Letter it does not have to be legally upheld.

    Salary Negotiation Email (6 Proven Templates)

    Below are suggested salary negotiation email samples. Each of the samples relates to either opening a salary negotiation in email or negotiating salary in email.

    l

    Salary Negotiation Email (Confirm the offer is negotiable)

    Subject: [First Name], I’m excited for this opportunity (Quick question)

    Hi [Employer Name],

    I am very excited by the opportunity to become your new [Job title]. I know I can excel in the position. Thank you for the offer.

    I’ve had a chance to review the offer and do some research. It is lower than what the market is paying for my skills and experience.

    I was wondering if the offer is negotiable?

    I sincerely appreciate your interest and possibility of joining the team. I look forward to hearing from you.

    Respectfully,
    [Insert name]

    l

    Salary negotiation email with another offer (Confirm the offer is negotiable)

    Subject: [First Name], I’m excited for this opportunity (Quick question)

    Hi [Employer Name],

    Thank you for the job offer! I’m very excited by the possibility of starting as your new [Job title].

    I have received another offer from a company in our industry for a similar position and am considering it.

    The offer better reflects what the market is currently paying someone with my skills, experience, and track record of success to perform the job’s duties and responsibilities.

    I can see myself being very happy at [Company] and excelling in the position. Is there room to negotiate the offer?

    I appreciate your time and consideration and look forward to hearing from you.

    Respectfully,
    [Insert name]

    How do you ask for a higher salary email? (Templates)

    In the case that the hiring manager has made an offer or proposal and it doesn’t reflect compensation for your skills and experience here’s an example of a salary negotiation email you could write to propose a counteroffer:

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    How Do You Ask for a Higher Salary Email Sample #1

    Subject: [Leave the subject line as is, you are responding to their email]

    Hi [Employer Name],

    I appreciate your offer and I’m excited to get started. I would be able to start on [Insert date] if we can increase the base salary to [Insert base pay number].

    This number represents what someone with my skills, experience, and track record of success is being paid in similar positions.

    The position requires:

    • [Insert a bullet point list of the job’s top responsibilities]

    I have:

    • [Insert a bullet point list of quantified work accomplishments that relate to the job’s top responsibilities]

    Additionally, I understand new hires in similar positions have been offered a signing bonus. Is a signing bonus included with the offer?

    Thank you in advance for your consideration! I look forward to your thoughts.

    Kind regards,
    [Your Name]

    It is important to note that this salary negotiation email template should be tailored to incorporate all compensation elements. If benefits, job perks, stock options, a different job title, etc. should be included make sure to appropriately add them in the email. Otherwise, you could get a final job offer letter that is missing details that you assumed would be included.

    Having to go back to the person you are negotiating with to continue a negotiation they thought was finished does not work in your favor. To avoid this the sentences below the quantified achievement bullet points can be edited to account for other details.

    Here’s another sample:

    l

    How Do You Ask for a Higher Salary Email Sample #2

    Subject: [Leave the subject line as is, you are responding to their email]

    Hi [Employer Name],

    I appreciate your offer and I’m excited to get started. I would be able to start on [Insert date] if we can increase the base salary to [Insert base pay number].

    This number represents what someone with my skills, experience, and track record of success is being paid in similar positions.

    The position requires:

    • [Insert a bullet point list of the job’s top responsibilities]

    I have:

    • [Insert a bullet point list of quantified work accomplishments that relate to the job’s top responsibilities]

    Additionally, in my research I noticed that other companies refer to the same position as [Insert Job Title] and the compensation includes stock options.

    What stock options does the company offer? And, would it be possible to accept the position with this job title?

    Thank you in advance for your consideration! I look forward to your thoughts. 

    Kind regards,
    [Your Name]

    l

    Entry Level Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: [Leave the subject line as is, you are responding to their email]

    Hi [Employer Name],

    I appreciate your offer and I’m excited to get started. I would be able to start on [Date] if we can increase the base pay to [Base pay number].

    This number represents what companies at a similar stage as [Company] in [City used to benchmark salary] are paying for the completion of the duties and responsibilities outlined in the job description.

    Additionally, I understand new hires in similar positions have been offered [Insert]. Is [Insert] included with the offer?

    Thank you in advance for your consideration! I look forward to your thoughts.

    Kind regards,
    [Your Name]

    The salary negotiation email above is for someone negotiating an entry-level position with absolutely no experience.

    If you are negotiating an entry-level position and have some experience that relates to the job’s duties and responsibilities then make sure to modify the email to include details on how your track record of success relates to the position.

    Salary Negotiation Email Sample PDF

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    Download a Salary Negotiation Email Sample PDF (6 Templates)

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    How to Negotiate Salary Offer via Email Sample (Flow)

    To help provide a sense of what a salary negotiation via email looks like below is a sample salary negotiation email flow between an employer and potential hire.

    It’s important to point out that no two salary negotiations are exactly the same. The how to negotiate salary offer via email sample flow below is entirely email based however it is possible to receive a verbal offer, request time to review the offer, be granted time to review the offer, and then to start a salary negotiation via email when you reach out to the employer to confirm if the offer is negotiable.

    There’s also a number of variables that contribute to how a salary negotiation is moved to and carried out on email. The example below is just one of them. Nonetheless, it provides a good example of what you might expect.

    Employer: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Hi Lina,

    Happy Monday, I hope you had a nice weekend. Thank you again for your interest in our company. The team was impressed by you and thinks you’ll add skills, experiences, and insights that we’re currently missing.

    As such I’d like to offer you the position of Product Manager with a base salary of $118,000.00.

    We want to get this position filled asap please let me know your answer by tomorrow.

    I look forward to your answer.

    Best,
    Trevor

    Potential Hire: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Thank you for the offer. I’m very excited by the opportunity. I know I can excel as your new Product Manager.

    I understand the urgency to get the position filled. At the moment I am reviewing a couple of other opportunities. I need a few days to consider the offers. I can get you an answer by Friday. Does this work?

    Also, at first glance the offer is lower than expected. Where does the offer fit on the compa ratio scale for the position and is the offer negotiable?

    I sincerely appreciate this opportunity and look forward to your thoughts.

    Respectfully,
    Lina

    Employer: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Hi Lina,

    We’re okay with Friday. Just please get back to us then.

    As far as the offer, it’s .85. What did you have in mind?

    Best,
    Trevor

    Potential Hire: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Hi Trevor,

    I appreciate you being open to discuss the compensation. Thank you.

    The base salary is low and reflects entry-level skills. The job’s duties and responsibilities reflect senior-level product manager responsibilities.

    I am looking for a base pay that is commensurate with what the market is paying Senior Product Managers with similar skills, experiences, education, and track record of success to complete the job’s duties.

    The offer was also just base pay and didn’t mention stock options, a signing bonus, the benefits and job perks, or the remote work location with flexible hours we discussed in the interview.

    I am very passionate about the space and have been thinking about how I can contribute to the development of the product.

    I’d love to join the team but right now the compensation is problematic. So I can fully understand the offer, what is the total rewards package? Also, is the company able to come up on base pay to reflect that this position is senior-level?

    I appreciate your time and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you.

    Kind regards,
    Lina

    Employer: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    What are you thinking on base pay?

    Attached is the total rewards package that details benefits and job perks. The position does include remote work with flexible work hours with overlapping work hours on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11 am – 2 pm PST.

    As for stock options we can offer 0.05%.

    Potential Hire: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Hi Trevor,

    Thank you for sharing the document. I have a clear sense of the benefits and job perks and they look great.

    I especially appreciate the unlimited time off with a mandatory 20 days of PTO. I love that the company really wants people to take time off to recharge.

    Based on another offer I have received as well as my research of what remote first companies with Series A funding are paying Senior Product Managers with my skills I am looking for a base pay of $183,275.00 with a signing bonus and 0.3% stock options.

    Does this work? I appreciate you working with me on this.

    Kind regards,
    Lina

    Employer: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Hi Lina,

    I spoke with the team and the base salary is out of our range. We are a Series A funded company however our A round was not that large. So the base pay doesn’t fit the budget.

    We do understand that you are a Senior Level Product manager and can offer you $154,300.00 with 0.1% stock options and a signing bonus of $5,000.00.

    If this works for you I can get everything written up in your Employee Offer Letter today.

    Best,
    Trevor

    Potential Hire: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Hi Trevor,

    The base pay is lower than other offers I have received.

    I really love the product and want to find a way to join the team without minimizing my market worth.

    The position requires owning the go-to-market for the product. In my last position I successfully developed the product roadmap from ideation to beta to launch resulting in 27% MoM user growth and an AAR of $2.75 M.

    It also requires contributing to the growth of the product team. In my last two roles I supported the hiring of entry and mid-level product managers. I reduced the onboarding time of new product managers by 43% by implementing a detailed e-learning course with documentation to help new team members quickly get up to speed in an organized fashion. This contributed to our GTM speed and success.

    To reflect what the market is paying for my experience, can we get the base pay up to $172,300.00 with 0.25% stock options, a signing bonus of $10,000.00, and have the job title be Senior Product Manager instead of just Product Manager?

    Thank you in advance. I appreciate your time and consideration.

    Kind regards,
    Lina

    Employer: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Hi Lina,

    The best we can do is $164,220.00 with a signing bonus of $7,500.00 and 0.15% stock and a cash bonus of $19,000.00 when you have been with us for one year and we have raised our next round of funding. The job title is no problem.

    Does this work for you? Please let me know asap. Our deadline for this is tomorrow.

    Best,
    Trevor

    Potential Hire: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Hi Trevor,

    Thank you for the offer. I am giving it thoughtful consideration and will get back to you by 1 pm PST tomorrow.

    Kind regards,
    Lina

    Potential Hire: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Hi Trevor,

    Thank you again for the offer and your willingness to increase compensation to reflect senior-level experience as well as my track record of success.

    I would like to accept the offer of:

    • Base pay: $164,220.00
    • Signing bonus: $7,500.00
    • Stock options: 0.15%
    • Cash bonus: $19,000.00 after one year of employment and the company has raised its next round of funding
    • Benefits and job perks: As outlined in the attached document
    • Job title: Senior Product Manager

    Kind regards,
    Lina

    Employer: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    This is great news Lina. I’m glad we were able to agree on this unique offer. Attached is your Employee Offer Letter.

    All the details are included as well as a start date one week from Monday.

    Please review all details and sign. Once we’ve executed the Offer Letter. Sonya will contact you to share a few details to get you ready for your first week.

    Potential Hire: Salary Negotiation Email

    Subject: Thank you for your interest

    Hi Trevor,

    Attached is the reviewed and signed Employee Offer Letter. Thank you for including all the details and for working with me on this!

    I’m very excited to join the team. I look forward to hearing from Sonya.

    Kind regards,
    Lina

    How to Negotiate Salary in Email (FAQs) 

    Salary negotiation email script

    How you negotiate via email is dependent on different variables such as: your knowledge of the position’s salary range, where a job offer falls on the compa ratio scale for the position, what the market is paying, your skill and experience level, the job’s duties and responsibilities, and your track record of success.

    The salary negotiation email script below assumes you have confirmed that the offer is negotiable and have knowledge of the variables listed above.

    Salary Negotiation Email Script

    Subject: [Employer Name], I’m excited about the role (Compensation question)

    Hi [Employer Name],

    I appreciate your offer and I’m very excited about the position.

    Understanding the job’s duties and responsibilities I see the position requires XYZ.

    I have previously [Insert what you achieved using metrics] by [Insert how you achieved the results].

    The market is paying [Insert specific dollar value] for someone with these skills.

    If you can come up to this base pay and [Insert stock, sign-on bonus, etc. variables] I can get started on [Insert date].

    Thank you in advance for your time and consideration. I look forward to hearing from you.

    Kind regards,
    [Your name]

    How do you politely negotiate salary via email?

    To politely negotiate salary via email, be gracious, show enthusiasm, be professional, and use data to negotiate (market data and your personal performance data). Never make demands, threats, give ultimatums, or respond emotionally. Present your negotiation points clearly, concisely, and free of spelling errors.

    How do you politely ask to negotiate salary?

    The manner in which you politely ask to negotiate salary varies slightly if you’re speaking to someone in-person or over email.

    In either situation, if you don’t have a job offer make sure you know what the company’s salary range is for the position and research what the market is paying for someone performing the job’s duties with your skills, experience, and track record of success.

    Only when you have their opening offer and know what compensation you want to negotiate for politely state (in-person or over email) “Thank you for the offer. My research shows that this is lower than what the market is paying for someone with my experience and track record of success. Is there room to negotiate?”

    Salary negotiation email no response

    One of the downsides of negotiating salary via email is that it is easier for the person you are negotiating with not to respond.

    Not hearing back from an employer during a salary negotiation via email can be the result of several things, including but not limited to the employer:

    • Being busy
    • Being out-of-office
    • Needing to discussed the offer with other team members
    • Needing to get approval on the offer from HR and/or other team members
    • Feeling uncomfortable with the salary negotiation email and ghosting the potential hire
    • Realizing that the potential hire wants more than the company can offer and ghosting the candidate

    Sending a salary negotiating email and getting no response can cause a lot of anxiety. Good salary negotiation is edicate to respond within 24 hours however employers have much more than negotiating one potential hire’s salary on their plate. As such, 72 hours is an acceptable timeframe for a response.

    If you have not received a response within 48 hours send a short follow-up email to make sure your email wasn’t overlooked.

    For example…

    Hi [Employer],

    I hope all is well with you! Just a quick follow-up on my previous email in case it slipped through the cracks.

    Thank you in advance. Looking forward to hearing back!

    Best,
    [Name]

    If 72 hours passes and you don’t hear back from them, give them a call. Chances are they won’t respond but you can leave a message or text asking them if they had a chance to review your last year.

    Conclusion

    So there you have it, salary negotiation email samples, the pros and cons and do’s and don’ts of negotiating salary over email, and steps to learn how to negotiate in email.

    Now that you understand how to negotiate salary in email you can confidently and politely negotiate for what you’re worth!

    To make the salary negotiation process even easier, create a PayDestiny account. Your account gives you access to powerful, self-serve tools to successfully negotiate, and maximize your base pay, sign-on bonus, job-perks, benefits, stock options, and more, in person, over the phone, or via email!

    Do you want to maximize your pay?

    PayDestiny provides you the tools you need to ace your salary negotiation.

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    Want to maximize your pay?

    Get everything you need to ace your salary negotiation. Create your PayDestiny account now.